SouthWest Metro Pickleball Club is pleased to announce a partnership with Michael Lynne’s Tennis Shop a local premiere Tennis and now Pickleball shop. 

‚Äč

While relatively new to Pickleball, Michael and Mimzy Lynne have been in the tennis business for over twenty years. In that time, they’ve learned what customers really want: expert advice, a great selection, and most of all, unmatched customer service. And that is exactly what they are now bringing to Pickleball. 

When you visit the store, you won’t find soccer balls, blenders or bicycles. What you’ll find is the region’s biggest selection of Pickleball equipment and apparel in a location staffed by friendly, helpful employees who know and love the game just as much as you do. 

 

Stop by their store at: Miracle Mile Shopping Center 5011 Excelsior Boulevard St. Louis Park, MN 55416  or visit their website and then head to the store!

 

Stop by and mention you are from the SW Metro Pickleball Club and welcome Mike and Mimzy to our Pickleball Community! 

 

 

Ask about their DEMO program. It’s a great way to try before you buy! 

The Three Most Important Things to Consider When Selecting a Paddle 

 

Sorting out what paddle is best for you can be a bit overwhelming! The best way to narrow the choices is to try out various paddles. So, here are three key considerations for everyone considering what pickleball paddle to purchase. 

 
 

#1 Price. Good composite pickleball paddles start at $50. There are three categories of paddles - wood prices range from $13-$36, composite from $45-$125 and graphite from $60- $190. Note on wood paddles - Wood paddles are the least expensivehowever, they are super heavy paddles with a solid plywood core. They don’t provide the wonderful pickleball POP that players love. If you're new to pickleball and looking for your first paddle, go for an inexpensive composite or graphite paddle right away. 

 
 

#2 Weight. Weight is the most important factor when choosing a paddle. Pickleball paddles can range from 6 to 14 ounces. Most composite or graphite paddles weigh from 6 to 9 ounces. Weight influences how a paddle feels when you pick it up and swing it on the court. For someone without pre-existing injuries, your choice of paddle weight is entirely up to your personal fitness level and comfort. A heavier paddle will help you to drive the ball but, will provide less control of the ball. However, be aware that the heaviness of the paddle also accelerates fatigue in your arm, and can strain your elbow. Conversely, a paddle that is too light may not provide enough drive but will increase ball control. 

 
 

#3 Grip Size. It is important to play with a paddle that has the correct grip circumference for your hand. Playing with a paddle grip that is too big may cause the paddle to slip in your hand and can lead to elbow problems. For this reason, if you are trying to decide between two sizes, try the smaller size first. Smaller grips allow for more wrist action, which aids in putting a spin on the ball and enhances control. This wrist action also produces powerful serves and facilitates quick hand changes for those players that switch hands during play. A larger grip will provide more stability, and be easier on your arm, so you can see that it is important to find the "just right" size for your hand. Competitive pickleball players often customize their paddle grips using an over-grip to re-wrap their paddle exactly to fit their personal preference.    
 
 

Why Paddle Weight Matters 

 
 

Weight is probably the most important factor when choosing a paddle. Weight influences how a paddle feels when you pick it up and swing it on the court. For someone without pre-existing injuries, your choice of paddle weight is entirely up to your personal fitness level and comfort. Pickleball paddles range from six ounces to 14 ounces. 

 
 

A heavier paddle will help you to drive the ball but offers less control of the ball. However, be aware that the heaviness of the paddle also accelerates fatigue in your arm, and can strain your elbow. 

 
 

Conversely, a paddle that is too light will not provide enough drive, may be difficult to support in your hand, but will increase ball control. 

 
 

 

Arthritis or Injury? 

 
 

If you have arthritis or an injury to your hand, elbow or shoulder, we recommend you select a middle-weight paddle between 7.3 and 8.4 ounces. This will be heavy enough to provide stability and absorb shock, yet light enough not to tax your arm 

 
 

Weight is probably the most important factor when choosing a paddle. Weight influences how a paddle feels when you pick it up and swing it on the court. 

 
 

Do not go too heavy. For people with hand, elbow or shoulder conditions, swinging a paddle heavier than 8.4 ounces could inflame your injury or arthritis. For this reason, most all wood paddles are out of consideration. 

 
 

Do not go too light. We consider a lightweight paddle to be any paddle under 7.2 ounces. A lightweight paddle will require you to put significant energy, swing, and momentum into each contact with the ball. The weight of the paddle will not help you drive the ball. It is like playing pickleball with a feather. 

 
 

Middleweight is just right! We think a middleweight paddle is just right for someone with an injury or arthritis.